In a screen-free world, audio identities on the rise

As voice-controlled technology becomes more and more present in everybody’s daily routine, brands need to respond quickly and create an emotional connection with their customers, without visuals.

by | Jan 19, 2018

Music Is Good For Selling More Food...

Visa is reinforcing its brand identity with the use of audio

Katie Richards in AdWeek explains, “Visa found that sound could make consumers feel safe and secure in their transactions, and that 81 percent of shoppers would have a more positive reaction to Visa if it incorporated sound into its marketing or shopping experience. With that in mind, the brand released a special sound in December. After using a Visa card, either in a digital or physical store, customers hear a chime of sorts, signifying a secure, speedy transaction. Eighty-three percent of respondents said Visa’s new sound sparked a positive perception of the brand.”

Pandora is working with brands more than ever and developing audio-driven marketing campaigns

“We are now in a currency of language and sound, as opposed to screens,” said Lauren Nagel, Group Creative Director at Pandora. “I think for a lot of folks the sound of your brand is still a bit of an afterthought, and as we move more toward a voice-activated world, sound is becoming even more important.”



Read More:

As Voice Continues its rise marketers are turning to sonic branding

Why Visa and other brands are refocusing on sound


Photos: Freepik, Freepik




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